Gail Staples

Posts by Gail Staples for Latest News:

Has the art of respectfully discussing ideas been lost? This question was raised in the article Disagreeing Well, written by Stephen Kinsella, that discussed four foundational attitudes: the first three - listen well, maintain an open mind, and respect the person – apply to schools in general; the fourth - give reason for the hope you have – has particular application for discussion about the Christian faith.

In response to the positive feedback and interest in the article, a curated reference list of resources is provided to develop and support professional learning in our school communities. There may be benefits in incorporating these resources into staff professional learning sessions as they can form a framework for discussion and develop confidence amongst the school staff to engage with a culture of alternative perspectives in a post-Christian, post-churched world.


This is part two of a two-part series.

As educators it is vital that we look at ways to work in our communities so that genuine partnership builds capacity for effective parental engagement, connecting learning at school, in the home, and in the community. Increasing parent engagement may be an ideal place for schools and community services to collaborate. While schools are pedagogy experts, community service agencies are experts in engaging all families but particularly those that are vulnerable.

Christian history is full of violence, corruption, and oppression. So, would we be better off without Christianity? Does religion poison everything? The history of the church offers plenty of ammunition to its critics. Crusades, inquisitions, witch hunts, the oppression of women ...

This article is part one of a two-part series.


‘The way schools care about children is reflected in the way schools care about the children’s families. If educators view children simply as students, they are likely to see the family as separate from the school. That is, the family is expected to do its job and leave the education of children to the schools. If educators view students as children, they are likely to see both the family and the community as partners with the school in children’s education and development’ (Epstein, 2009).

Anglican EdComm and St Andrew’s Cathedral School presented an inaugural seminar ‘Finding Balance and Meeting the Challenges’ on May 2, and the topics offered were shaped by advice from current education students at various universities.

The purpose of the evening was to prepare and support pre-service teachers as they apply and interview for teaching positions, and consider how they will integrate their faith and work for the growth of the gospel.

The Richard Johnson lecture, an activity of the Centre for Public Christianity (CPX), was delivered on March 14th, 2018. The lecture series ‘seeks to highlight Christianity’s relevance to society and positively contribute to public discourse on key aspects of civil life’.

The launch of the 2018 Anglican Schools/Youthworks College and EdComm Internship program

Many Anglican schools and colleges have expressed the need for more committed and high quality Christian people to join the teaching profession and contribute to the exciting task of building into the lives of students - the next generation of adults. This aligns with the EdComm goal of encouraging Christians to consider teaching as a vocation.

The secular world, including those in our school communities and beyond, hear from many writers and speakers about motivation from within. Daniel H.

Trust should be integral to the framing of our spiritual, professional and personal lives as many elements of trust are intertwined in the way we behave in these three aspects. At the Agora meeting in April 2017 Dr McCulla and Dr Marks spoke on recent international research...

The most powerful marketing tool we have for encouraging young Christians and career-change Christians to consider teaching as a vocation for the gospel is ourselves- the educators! We are modelling our faith each day and we have opportunities to speak about why we love our work (mostly!) What opportunities do we have each day? How we can positively advocate for our students to thoughtfully consider training as a teacher?

 

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