Category: Preservice Teachers

 

 

Anglican EdComm is delighted announce that we will partnering with Growth Coaching International (GCI) to bring customised, high quality professional learning programs to our members in 2018.

“Culture is the hidden tool to transform schools and to offer students the best learning possible." Fullan and Hargreaves (1996) use the concept of “culture” to refer to the guiding beliefs and expectations evident in the way a school operates, particularly in reference to how people relate to each other. Put simply, they say culture is the way things are done in a particular school. 

The secular world, including those in our school communities and beyond, hear from many writers and speakers about motivation from within. Daniel H.

The most powerful marketing tool we have for encouraging young Christians and career-change Christians to consider teaching as a vocation for the gospel is ourselves- the educators! We are modelling our faith each day and we have opportunities to speak about why we love our work (mostly!) What opportunities do we have each day? How we can positively advocate for our students to thoughtfully consider training as a teacher?

 

He has been described as a ‘guru’ by Professor John Hattie. No matter what you think of him, Pasi Sahlberg definitely has some helpful insights into education globally. His experience as a teacher and then system leader in Finland, alongside his international work means that people sit up and take notice when he speaks.

Bullying in schools has been an issue for many years. Schools have strived to address the issue implementing various pastoral programs to raise awareness and provide students with mechanisms to seek help.

Trust is a concept that we do not often discuss in the context of the school environment but it is a concept that is fundamental to both the good functioning of a school and the relationships within it. The Webster dictionary defines trust as “an assured (or confident) reliance on the character, ability, strength, or truth of someone or something.”

The combination of these two words has fascinated me for some years. And after meeting Jamie Smith and reading “Desiring the Kingdom” I became hooked on what seemed an obvious proposition: that every teacher whether they recognised it or not, was contributing to the moral, spiritual, social and cultural formation of their students. Jamie’s focus on rituals and liturgy as outcomes of the process made a lot of sense.

Around the world educators and philanthropists, for a multiplicity of reasons, seem to be taking a fresh interest in devoting time and resources to what is variously called ‘character development,’ ‘character education’ or ‘positive psychology.’ In the United Kingdom, the wealthy businessman, Sir John Templeton has declared that character, and specifically its neglect, is the number one issue of our age. A society that is not grounded in deep values, that doesn’t know who are its heroes and which lacks commitment to the common good, is one that is failing. Such we have become.’

What an amazing opportunity schools have, to build into the men and women of tomorrow. To speak into their character development and to equip them with the skills and tools to think and to contribute. To hold out to them the existence of ‘truth’, and training in the tools to pursue and find it. At a time when our culture is moving quickly towards uncertainty and relativity, a place where there is no one truth, but many truths, we have a great responsibility.

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