Category: Events

 

 

Anglican EdComm launched the Aspiring Leaders Network in August 2017. We were pleased to have Emeritus Professor Patrick Duignan deliver the keynote address entitled Leading with Influence: The Power of Presence, Positive Relationships and Collective Responsibility.

 

International evidence says today’s schooling is out of step with producing students with the skills to survive and thrive in the complex and demanding 21st century. Instead of resilient life-long learners schools are producing dependent, passive high and low achievers who frequently lack resilience and real world intelligence. 


What is gender fluidity, and how do schools and their leaders support and care for students who are lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender or intersex (LGBTI) in a Godly and loving way, while fulfilling legal obligations and maintaining the integrity of Anglican schools? This was the purpose behind Anglican EdComm’s Governors’ Evening held in November last year, where the leaders and governors of our Anglican schools came together to discuss issues critical to Anglican education and to collaborate in an ongoing sense.

LEAP (Leading Educators Around the Planet) is an International peer-shadowing program for Principals, Deputy-Principals, Directors and non school-based education personnel. The program involves hosting an international colleague for a two-week leadership program in July, and being hosted by that international colleague (in their location) for a reciprocal two-week program in the September school holidays.

Trust is a concept that we do not often discuss in the context of the school environment but it is a concept that is fundamental to both the good functioning of a school and the relationships within it. The Webster dictionary defines trust as “an assured (or confident) reliance on the character, ability, strength, or truth of someone or something.”

What an amazing opportunity schools have, to build into the men and women of tomorrow. To speak into their character development and to equip them with the skills and tools to think and to contribute. To hold out to them the existence of ‘truth’, and training in the tools to pursue and find it. At a time when our culture is moving quickly towards uncertainty and relativity, a place where there is no one truth, but many truths, we have a great responsibility.

Knowing More About More, Being Better Thinkers, Being Better People

Dow explains that the benefits that come to the intellectually virtuous person can be broken down into 3 categories: we come to know more, become better thinkers, and become better people (p79).

Intellectual humility is probably the most difficult of the virtues to develop because this goes against the currents of our culture, and pride is deeply rooted in all of us (p75).

We often do what we want and then create a moral code that suits our actions……the result is a corrupted intellectual conscience that no longer values the truth, if it can still distinguish the truth from falsehood at all. Dallas Willard has argued that this results in our behaviour guiding our ethics rather than our ethics guiding our behaviour (p66). What a dangerous place to be!

Curiosity is defined as “an eager desire to know; inquisitiveness”. It asks the questions ‘why’ and ‘how’ and pursues the answers. It is often the forerunner of invention and new ideas. It is not just a state of mind but is active in its observation, investigation and exploration; in its pursuit of answers.

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