Category: Events

 

 

Following on from the Royale Ormsby Martin Lecture entitled 'Teaching for Humanity' in 2016, we invited Dr Mark Stephens to address an Agora forum on the topic of ‘The Integrity of Commitment: Formation not Inoculation’.

The two talks have a great deal of synergy as we continue to consider the impact of secularism and our endeavour to present Christ in our Schools. It is no surprise to say that Western culture has substantially altered its relationship to religion. This has impacted the way education is framed and it has had a peculiar impact on faith-based schools. The greatest impact has been the shift in the way people think and the questions that are asked of, or about faith.

The concept of faith impacting on work has been in the news lately, with Scott Morrison’s faith being seen as a threat to democracy.

Well-known atheist Jane Caro tweeted that “Theocracies are terrifying, particularly for women and anyone who is different in any way. They are never democratic because they favour one group above all others - those who worship the ‘right’ god.”

This is an excerpt from the book 'Workship: How to Use your Work to Worship God' by Kara Martin.

I have two adult children. Jaslyn is 21, and Guy is 19. Right from the moment they were born I realised that I had to be careful in the way I thought about them. They are not my children, they are a gift from God.

God has given me stewardship over them for as long as I live. They are a beautiful and treasured gift, but I try and make sure I hold them lightly.

On Saturday May 5, 2018, Anglican EdComm welcomed Dr Donald Guthrie of Trinity Evangelical Divinity School, Chicago to deliver the keynote addresses at the Christians in Teaching Conference which focused on ‘Resilient Teaching’. Below are the video recordings of the third and fourth sessions of the conference. You can find the accompanying slide deck and notes used to guide these sessions below.


Q: What do schools and coaching have in common?

John Campbell proposes that education and coaching ‘share a common purpose: helping people to learn, grow and develop’ (Campbell and van Nieuwerburgh, 2018, p.3).

Student learning and development is the core business of school education. Learning however, is rarely talked about in isolation from teaching, which makes the role of the teacher critical in student learning. Coaching that focuses primarily on improving teacher practice or leadership practice may also improve student learning.

On Saturday May 5, 2018, Anglican EdComm welcomed Dr Donald Guthrie of Trinity Evangelical Divinity School, Chicago to deliver the keynote addresses at the Christians in Teaching Conference which focused on ‘Resilient Teaching’. This video, is the recording of the second session at the conference and the accompanying set of notes that were used to guide this session can be found below.

On Saturday May 5, 2018 Anglican EdComm welcomed Dr Donald Guthrie of Trinity Evangelical Divinity School, Chicago to deliver the keynote addresses at the Christians in Teaching Conference which focused on ‘Resilient Teaching’.

Just prior to delivering the talks at Moore Theological College, Dr Guthrie was asked to take part in a live interview on The Pastor’s Heart.

We need to talk about resilience. The term’s been around for a long time, well, at least for a couple of decades in education. Perhaps it has been around long enough to be taken for granted. The focus of the recent EdComm Conference was on Resilient Teaching. I asked some of the attendees how familiar they were with the term. Some said they’d been thinking about it as an individual but it was not a topic that had received much attention at their school. Others said they were having lively debates with their fellow teachers about the relevance of resilience (and wellness) and had registered for the conference to find out what Dr Donald Guthrie had to say about it. In fact, three respondents from different schools said that their principals had sponsored up to a dozen staff to attend the conference with a view to promoting informed discourse and practical action with the rest of the staff on their return.

'The heart of every leader must be humble, seeking the good of others and suspicious of one's own motives' James Plueddemann, Leading across cultures (Burns, Chapman & Guthrie, p77).

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