Category: Emerging Leaders

 

 


This is part two of a two-part series.

As educators it is vital that we look at ways to work in our communities so that genuine partnership builds capacity for effective parental engagement, connecting learning at school, in the home, and in the community. Increasing parent engagement may be an ideal place for schools and community services to collaborate. While schools are pedagogy experts, community service agencies are experts in engaging all families but particularly those that are vulnerable.

On Saturday May 5, 2018, Anglican EdComm welcomed Dr Donald Guthrie of Trinity Evangelical Divinity School, Chicago to deliver the keynote addresses at the Christians in Teaching Conference which focused on ‘Resilient Teaching’. This video, is the recording of the second session at the conference and the accompanying set of notes that were used to guide this session can be found below.

Christian history is full of violence, corruption, and oppression. So, would we be better off without Christianity? Does religion poison everything? The history of the church offers plenty of ammunition to its critics. Crusades, inquisitions, witch hunts, the oppression of women ...

This article is part one of a two-part series.


‘The way schools care about children is reflected in the way schools care about the children’s families. If educators view children simply as students, they are likely to see the family as separate from the school. That is, the family is expected to do its job and leave the education of children to the schools. If educators view students as children, they are likely to see both the family and the community as partners with the school in children’s education and development’ (Epstein, 2009).

On Saturday May 5, 2018 Anglican EdComm welcomed Dr Donald Guthrie of Trinity Evangelical Divinity School, Chicago to deliver the keynote addresses at the Christians in Teaching Conference which focused on ‘Resilient Teaching’.

Think of a time when you were telling someone something that you really wanted them to ‘hear’. Perhaps you had summoned the courage to approach a leader and discuss a sensitive issue. Perhaps it was a family member or a trusted friend who you wanted to share a painful experience with, or perhaps it was the person next to you at work who had told you in depth about their holiday and you were about to tell them about your holiday. Whatever the situation, the common ground was that the other person did not listen. You just did not feel heard!

Just prior to delivering the talks at Moore Theological College, Dr Guthrie was asked to take part in a live interview on The Pastor’s Heart.

We need to talk about resilience. The term’s been around for a long time, well, at least for a couple of decades in education. Perhaps it has been around long enough to be taken for granted. The focus of the recent EdComm Conference was on Resilient Teaching. I asked some of the attendees how familiar they were with the term. Some said they’d been thinking about it as an individual but it was not a topic that had received much attention at their school. Others said they were having lively debates with their fellow teachers about the relevance of resilience (and wellness) and had registered for the conference to find out what Dr Donald Guthrie had to say about it. In fact, three respondents from different schools said that their principals had sponsored up to a dozen staff to attend the conference with a view to promoting informed discourse and practical action with the rest of the staff on their return.

(This is the final part of an 8-part series reflecting on the book, Resilient Ministry: What pastors told us about surviving and thriving.)In a school setting the tasks of management...

'The heart of every leader must be humble, seeking the good of others and suspicious of one's own motives' James Plueddemann, Leading across cultures (Burns, Chapman & Guthrie, p77).

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