Category: Agora

 

 

Trust should be integral to the framing of our spiritual, professional and personal lives as many elements of trust are intertwined in the way we behave in these three aspects. At the Agora meeting in April 2017 Dr McCulla and Dr Marks spoke on recent international research...

International evidence says today’s schooling is out of step with producing students with the skills to survive and thrive in the complex and demanding 21st century. Instead of resilient life-long learners schools are producing dependent, passive high and low achievers who frequently lack resilience and real world intelligence. 

He has been described as a ‘guru’ by Professor John Hattie. No matter what you think of him, Pasi Sahlberg definitely has some helpful insights into education globally. His experience as a teacher and then system leader in Finland, alongside his international work means that people sit up and take notice when he speaks.


What is gender fluidity, and how do schools and their leaders support and care for students who are lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender or intersex (LGBTI) in a Godly and loving way, while fulfilling legal obligations and maintaining the integrity of Anglican schools? This was the purpose behind Anglican EdComm’s Governors’ Evening held in November last year, where the leaders and governors of our Anglican schools came together to discuss issues critical to Anglican education and to collaborate in an ongoing sense.

LEAP (Leading Educators Around the Planet) is an International peer-shadowing program for Principals, Deputy-Principals, Directors and non school-based education personnel. The program involves hosting an international colleague for a two-week leadership program in July, and being hosted by that international colleague (in their location) for a reciprocal two-week program in the September school holidays.

The combination of these two words has fascinated me for some years. And after meeting Jamie Smith and reading “Desiring the Kingdom” I became hooked on what seemed an obvious proposition: that every teacher whether they recognised it or not, was contributing to the moral, spiritual, social and cultural formation of their students. Jamie’s focus on rituals and liturgy as outcomes of the process made a lot of sense.

Around the world educators and philanthropists, for a multiplicity of reasons, seem to be taking a fresh interest in devoting time and resources to what is variously called ‘character development,’ ‘character education’ or ‘positive psychology.’ In the United Kingdom, the wealthy businessman, Sir John Templeton has declared that character, and specifically its neglect, is the number one issue of our age. A society that is not grounded in deep values, that doesn’t know who are its heroes and which lacks commitment to the common good, is one that is failing. Such we have become.’

What an amazing opportunity schools have, to build into the men and women of tomorrow. To speak into their character development and to equip them with the skills and tools to think and to contribute. To hold out to them the existence of ‘truth’, and training in the tools to pursue and find it. At a time when our culture is moving quickly towards uncertainty and relativity, a place where there is no one truth, but many truths, we have a great responsibility.

Knowing More About More, Being Better Thinkers, Being Better People

Dow explains that the benefits that come to the intellectually virtuous person can be broken down into 3 categories: we come to know more, become better thinkers, and become better people (p79).

In February 2012, Anglican EdComm, acting on behalf of the Diocese of Sydney, urged the Parliamentary Inquiry into the Education Amendment (Ethics Classes Repeal) Bill, to commission an external review of the teaching of Special Religious Education (Scripture) and Special Education in Ethics in government schools in New South Wales. There was vocal opposition from some members of the Committee but the Government bought the idea and ARTD Consultants were given the task.

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