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This is Part Two of a six-part series that will look at Kara Martin's book, 'Workship: How to use your work to worship God.' Kara Martin is the keynote speaker at EdComm's annual Integral Project Dinner on October 25.


‘Calling is the truth that God calls us to himself so decisively that everything we are, do and have is invested with a special devotion, and direction lived out as a response to his summons and service.’ (Os Guinness in Martin 2017,  p124)

This is Part One of a six-part series that will look at Kara Martin's book, 'Workship: How to use your work to worship God.' Kara Martin is the keynote speaker at EdComm's annual Integral Project Dinner on October 25. 

'If we don't worship through our work we will either worship work itself, the money or status it brings or treat work as a mere means to the end of rest or a hedonistic retirement' (Gordon Preece in Martin, 2017, p.xv).

'Work in some form, paid or unpaid, is part of adult life. It is a fact of life. Ogden Nash says ‘If you don't want to work, you have to work so that you earn enough money so that you don't have to work’ (Martin, 2017, p.27).

While many know real fulfilment through their work, others experience the grind and demands of the daily work routine as more of a curse than a blessing. This is no surprise when we look at the origins of work in the Bible. From the creation we know that God worked and took delight in His work as a good thing. He worked for six of the seven days of creation. When man was made, he was made in the image of God and he too was invited to join in the work, to name the beasts and to work the ground. However, after disobeying God’s instructions, working the ground became onerous hard work.

Following on from the Royale Ormsby Martin Lecture entitled 'Teaching for Humanity' in 2016, we invited Dr Mark Stephens to address an Agora forum on the topic of ‘The Integrity of Commitment: Formation not Inoculation’.

The two talks have a great deal of synergy as we continue to consider the impact of secularism and our endeavour to present Christ in our Schools. It is no surprise to say that Western culture has substantially altered its relationship to religion. This has impacted the way education is framed and it has had a peculiar impact on faith-based schools. The greatest impact has been the shift in the way people think and the questions that are asked of, or about faith.

Has the art of respectfully discussing ideas been lost? This question was raised in the article Disagreeing Well, written by Stephen Kinsella, that discussed four foundational attitudes: the first three - listen well, maintain an open mind, and respect the person – apply to schools in general; the fourth - give reason for the hope you have – has particular application for discussion about the Christian faith.

In response to the positive feedback and interest in the article, a curated reference list of resources is provided to develop and support professional learning in our school communities. There may be benefits in incorporating these resources into staff professional learning sessions as they can form a framework for discussion and develop confidence amongst the school staff to engage with a culture of alternative perspectives in a post-Christian, post-churched world.